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CAOS DE JAMES GLEICK PDF

James Gleick is an American author and historian of science whose work has chronicled the . E Notes. ^ Doctorow, Cory (March 24, ). “James Gleick’s tour-de-force: The Information, a natural history of information theory”. Boing Boing. Few writers distinguish themselves by their ability to write about complicated, even obscure topics clearly and engagingly. In Chaos, James Gleick, a former. Start by marking “Caos: a criação de uma nova ciência” as Want to Read: In Chaos, James Gleick, a former science writer for the New York Times, shows that .

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This is not a purely technical book. Instead, it focuses as much on the scientists studying chaos as on the chaos itself. In the pages of Gleick’s book, the reader meets dozens of extraordinary and eccentric people. For instance, Mitchell Feigenbaum, who constructed and regulated his life by a hour clock and watched his waking hours come in and out of phase with those of his coworkers at Los Alamos National Laboratory. As for chaos itself, Gleick does an outstanding job of explaining the thought processes and investigative techniques that researchers bring to bear on chaos problems.

Rather than attempt to explain Julia sets, Lorenz attractors and the Mandelbrot Set with gigantically complicated equations, Chaos relies on sketches, photographs and Gleick’s wonderful descriptive prose. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read.

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Return to Book Page. Preview — Caos by James Gleick. Few writers distinguish themselves by their ability to write about complicated, even obscure topics clearly and engagingly. In ChaosJames Gleick, a former science writer for the New York Timesshows that he resides in this exclusive category. Here he takes on the job of depicting the first years of the study of chaos–the seemingly random patterns that characterise many Few writers distinguish themselves by their ability to write about complicated, even obscure topics clearly and engagingly.

Here he takes fleick the job of depicting the first years of the study of chaos–the seemingly random patterns that characterise many natural phenomena. Mass Market Paperback4pages. Published by Campus first published To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up. To ask other readers questions about Caosplease sign up. If I read the audiobook version, will I be missing out anything particularly important figures, graphs, etc?

Ashish Singh Not to the extent that you will miss the point. Having said that it is highly advised to google the terms described in the book, like ‘fractal …more Not to the extent that you will miss the point. Having said that it is highly advised to google the terms described in the book, like ‘fractal dimensions’ and ‘strange attractor’ jamez actually visualize the mind of the god!!! Caod all 4 questions about Caos….

Lists with This Book. This book is not yet featured on Listopia. View all 4 comments.

The force living just beyond the push. This burn of the natural world, this magic of the unknown, is what draws me to read physics and philosophy as an cqos amature. There are pieces and fractures in these books that actually DON’T escape me. They hit my brain and ja,es and keep spinning forever. I imagine this is something felt also by Gleick, one of the top tier science writers out there.

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My big grievance with this book is it falls too short. His narrative is compelling, yes, the stories are interesting, sure, but he doesn’t grab the central characters as well as a new journalist like John McPhee does. He floats too far above jsmes actual science and complexity. He shows you pictures and dances around the pools of chaos and clouds of complexity, but never actually puts the reader INTO the churning water or shoots the reader into energized, cumuliform heaps.

This is a book for an advanced HS senior or an average college Freshman. It is caoe and definitely has its place.

Caos: a criação de uma nova ciência by James Gleick (3 star ratings)

This is a book that is more about translating the story of the science not the science for NOT the layman, but really the lazy layman. That is probably one of the reasons it did so well. Anyway, I’m glad I read iames, but just wish it was deeper, thicker, and way less predictable.

A series of extremely interesting and well-written biographies and anecdotes which don’t really explain directly what chaos theory really is. No equations and lots of graphs, but that’s just to make sure the general public isn’t scared away. Still, Gleick conveys the ‘appeal’ of chaos theory, or at least what people think it is about.

Caos La Creacion De Una Ciencia : James Gleick :

In a complex system, the most minuscule change in initial conditions leads to drastic or unpredictable changes in the output. It is important not just in physics or A series of extremely interesting and well-written biographies and anecdotes which don’t really explain directly what chaos theory really is.

It is important not just in physics or mathematics, but astronomy, climatology, biology, even economics. Even if we can find a mathematical model behind the behavior of these complex systems, we cannot necessarily predict them. View all 8 comments. A great introduction to new readers of the subject. If one is keeping up with physics for last decade or so, the content of Chaos doesn’t offer anything new. With the introduction to chaos theory, Gleick gives a wide variety of historical anecdotes involving various scientists across borders and scientific disciplines who have observed the phenomenon but haven’t been able to nail it.

Chaos brings these stories together and puts them under an umbrella.

The narration becomes easier to follow and t A great introduction to new readers of caaos subject. The narration becomes easier to follow and the scientific disciplines converge. There’s not enough math for my liking and too much rambling about the scientists rather than what they actually did. Although I in the spirit of chaos, JG writes this strangely attractive book jsmes an unpredictably aperiodically chaotic fashion, I never understand the messy structure of this book.

Caos La Creacion De Una Ciencia

Although I still like this one a lot, I think I’ve read better books on chaos theory. Chaos theory started with Poincare’s investigation into the three-body problem when he realized that no exact formula exists beyond Newton’s differential equations for making predictions of the three body problem. Not much was taken up from there till the s, when the computer revolutionized this new field of mathematics, allowing mathematicians to do complex iterative calculations and do experiments.

Non-linearity can no longer be ignored. This might well be another revolution in science, like quantum mechanics and relativity half a century earlier. It’s difficult to summarize this book, but some remarkable and thought-provoking statements to take away: Then, for no reason whatsoever, it shifts into a different sort of behavior, still fluctuating but producing a different average.

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Yet it takes no great imagination for a climatologist to see that almost-intransitivity might well explain why the earth’s climate has drifted in and out of long Ice Ages at mysterious, irregular intervals.

The Ice Ages may simply be a byproduct of chaos. The system is deterministic, but you can’t say what it’s going to do next. The spontaneous emergence of self-organization ought to be part of physics. Nature must be playing its own version of the chaos game.

The Mandelbrot set obeys an extraordinarily precise scheme leaving nothing to chance whatsoever. I strongly suspect that the day somebody actually figures out how the brain is organized they will discover to their amazement that there is a coding scheme for building the brain which is of extraordinary precision.

The idea of randomness in biology is just reflex. Quote John Hubbard “Many other scientists began to apply the formalisms of chaos to research in artificial intelligence.

The dynamics of systems wandering between basins of attraction appealed to those looking for a way to model symbols and memories. Their fractal structure offered the kind of infinitely self-referential quality that seems so central to the mind’s ability to bloom with ideas, decisions, emotions, and all the other artifacts of consciousness. With or without chaos, serious cognitive scientists can no longer model the mind as a static structure.

They recognize a hierarchy of scales, from neuron upward, providing an opportunity for the interplay of microscale and macroscale so characteristic of fluid turbulence and other dynamical systems. Experimenters have to use their hands, too. Theorists are thinkers, experimenters are craftsmen. The experimenter has to muster graduate students, cajole machinists, flatter lab assistants.

The theorist operates in a pristine place free of noise, of vibration and dirt. The experimenter develops an intimacy with matter as a sculptor does with clay, jmes it, shaping it and engaging it. The theorist invents his companions, as a naive Romeo imagined his ideal Juliet. The experimenter’s lovers sweat, complain and fart. Although I truly enjoy the way James Gleick jjames take a jmaes subject apart for the inexpert, I did not enjoy this book as much as I did The Information.

I caught myself skipping, counting pages to the end of the chapter, even yawning and dropping off. Not a good sign for me. Some chapters daos me on the edge of my seat, or thinking “Ah ha! That’s how that works. It is obvious that Mr.

Caos: a criação de uma nova ciência

Gleick enjoys the subjects that he writes about and it is difficult to not become affected with his enthusiasm. However, in Chaoshis excitement about the subject, tends to cause him to wander, attempting to get every single detail in that he can.

When the first sentence of a chapter tells you that so-and-so showed up at the front door of someone’s lab, I like to know who that person is and yleick he might be there fairly quickly, not 10 pages later. By that time I’m rereading pages thinking I must have missed who this person is and why he’s standing at the door of someone’s lab. I’ve also forgotten whose lab! Overall, I did enjoy the book and will probably watch for more by this author.