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AAMFT CODE OF ETHICS 2012 PDF

CODE OF ETHICS. Effective July 1, Preamble. The Board of Directors of the American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy. (AAMFT) hereby. advancing the welfare of families and individuals” (AMMFT, ). However, while The AAMFT Code of Ethics refers to the responsibility to advance the. (, July 01). Code of Ethics. Retrieved from Content/Legal_Ethics/ Guide, C. T. (

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Please note the codes in our collection ethica not necessarily be the most recent versions. Please contact the individual organizations or their websites to verify if a more recent or updated code of ethics is available. CSEP does not hold copyright on any of the codes of ethics in our collection.

Any permission to use the codes must be sought from the individual organizations directly. The AAMFT strives to honor the public trust in marriage and family therapists by setting standards for ethical practice as described in this Code. Marriage and family therapists are defined by an enduring dedication to professional and ethical excellence, as well as the commitment to service, advocacy, and public participation.

The areas of service, advocacy, and public participation are recognized as responsibilities to the profession equal in importance to all other aspects. Marriage and family therapists embody these aspirations by participating in activities that contribute to a better community and society, including devoting a portion of their professional activity to services for which there is little or no financial return.

Additionally, marriage and family therapists are concerned with developing laws and regulations pertaining to marriage and family therapy that serve the public interest, and with altering such laws and regulations that are not in the public interest.

Marriage and family therapists also codr public participation in the design and delivery of professional services and in the regulation of practitioners. Professional competence in these areas is essential to the character of the field, cod to the well-being of clients and their communities. The absence of an explicit reference to a specific behavior or situation in the Code does not mean that the behavior is ethical or unethical. The standards are not exhaustive.

Marriage and family therapists who are uncertain about the ethics of a particular course of action are encouraged to seek counsel from consultants, attorneys, supervisors, colleagues, or other appropriate authorities. Both law and ethics govern the off of marriage and family therapy.

When making decisions regarding professional behavior, marriage and family therapists must consider the AAMFT Code of Ethics and applicable laws and regulations. Marriage and family therapists comply with the mandates of law, but make known their commitment to the AAMFT Code of Ethics and take steps to resolve the conflict in a responsible manner. If the mandates of an organization with which a marriage and family therapist is affiliated, through employment, contract or otherwise, conflict with the AAMFT Code of Ethics, marriage and family therapists make known to the organization their commitment to the AAMFT Code of Ethics and take reasonable steps to resolve the conflict if a way that allows the fullest adherence to the Code of Ethics.

Lack of awareness or misunderstanding of an ethical standard is not a defense to a charge of unethical aamtf. Persons accused are considered innocent by the Ethics Committee until proven guilty, except as eghics provided, and are entitled to due process. If an Aanft member resigns in anticipation of, or during the aqmft of, an ethics investigation, aamvt Ethics Committee will complete its investigation.

Any publication of action taken by the Association will include the fact that the member attempted to resign during the investigation. The following core values speak generally to the membership of AAMFT as a professional association, yet they also inform all the varieties of practice and service in which marriage and family therapists engage. These core values are aspirational in nature, and are distinct from ethical standards. These values are intended to provide an aspirational framework within which marriage and family therapists may pursue the highest goals of practice.

Ethical standards, by contrast, are rules efhics practice upon which the marriage and family therapist is obliged and judged. Marriage and family therapists advance the welfare of families and individuals and make reasonable efforts to find the appropriate balance between conflicting goals within the family system.

Marriage and family therapists provide professional assistance to persons ethicw discrimination on the basis of race, age, ethnicity, socioeconomic status, disability, gender, health status, religion, national origin, sexual orientation, gender identity or relationship status.

Marriage and family therapists obtain appropriate informed consent to therapy or related procedures and use language that is reasonably understandable to clients. When persons, ethicx to age or mental status, are legally incapable of giving informed consent, marriage and family therapists obtain informed permission from a legally authorized person, if such substitute consent is legally permissible. The content of informed consent may vary depending upon the client and treatment plan; however, informed consent generally necessitates that the client: Marriage and family therapists are aware of their influential positions with respect to clients, and they avoid exploiting the trust and dependency of such persons.

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Therapists, therefore, make every effort to avoid conditions and multiple relationships with clients that could impair professional judgment or 20012 the risk of exploitation. When the risk of impairment or exploitation exists due to conditions or multiple roles, therapists document the appropriate precautions taken.

American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy Code of Ethics | Ethics Codes Collection

Marriage and family therapists comply with applicable laws regarding the reporting of alleged unethical conduct. Marriage and family therapists respect the rights of clients to make decisions and help them to understand the consequences of these decisions.

Therapists clearly advise clients that clients have the responsibility to make decisions regarding relationships such as cohabitation, marriage, divorce, separation, reconciliation, custody, and visitation. Marriage and family therapists continue therapeutic relationships only so long as it is reasonably clear that clients are benefiting from the relationship. Marriage and family therapists respectfully assist persons in obtaining appropriate therapeutic services if the therapist is unable or unwilling to provide professional help.

Marriage and family therapists do not abandon or neglect clients in treatment without making reasonable arrangements ckde the continuation of treatment.

American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy Code of Ethics

Marriage and family therapists obtain written informed consent from clients before recording any images or audio or permitting third-party observation. Marriage and family therapists, upon agreeing to provide services to a person or entity at the request of a third party, clarify, to the extent feasible and at the outset of the service, the nature of the relationship with each party and the limits of confidentiality.

Marriage and family therapists have unique confidentiality concerns because the client in a therapeutic relationship may be more than one person. Therapists respect and guard the confidences of each individual client. Therapists review with clients the circumstances where confidential information may be requested and where disclosure 20012 confidential information may be legally required.

Circumstances may necessitate repeated disclosures. Marriage and family therapists do not disclose client confidences except by written authorization or waiver, or where mandated or permitted by law. Verbal authorization will not be sufficient except in emergency situations, unless prohibited by law.

When providing couple, family or group treatment, the therapist does not disclose information outside the treatment context without a written authorization from each individual competent to execute a waiver. Marriage and family therapists provide clients with reasonable access to records concerning the clients.

When providing couple, family, or group treatment, the therapist does not provide access to records without a written authorization from each individual competent to execute a waiver. Marriage and family therapists take steps to protect the confidentiality of other individuals identified in client records. Marriage and family therapists store, safeguard, and dispose of client records in ways that maintain confidentiality and in accord with applicable laws and professional standards.

In preparation for moving a practice, closing a practice, or death, marriage and family therapists arrange for the storage, transfer, or disposal of client records in conformance with applicable laws and in ways that maintain confidentiality and safeguard the welfare of clients.

Marriage and family therapists, when consulting with colleagues or referral sources, do not share confidential information that could reasonably lead to the identification of a client, research participant, supervisee, or other person with whom they have a confidential relationship unless they have obtained the prior written consent of the client, research participant, supervisee, or other person with whom they have a confidential relationship. Information may be shared only to the extent necessary to achieve the purposes of the consultation.

Marriage and family therapists maintain high standards of professional competence and integrity. Marriage and family therapists pursue appropriate consultation and training to ensure adequate knowledge of and adherence to applicable laws, ethics, and professional standards. Marriage and family therapists seek appropriate professional assistance for issues that may impair work performance or clinical judgment. Marriage and family therapists do not provide services that create a conflict of interest that may impair work performance or clinical judgment.

Marriage and family therapists maintain accurate and adequate clinical and financial records in accordance with applicable law. While developing new skills in specialty areas, marriage and family therapists take steps to ensure the competence of their work and to protect clients from possible harm. Marriage and family therapists do not engage in sexual or other forms of harassment of clients, students, trainees, supervisees, employees, colleagues, or research subjects.

Marriage and family therapists do not engage in the exploitation of clients, students, trainees, supervisees, employees, colleagues, or research subjects. Marriage and family therapists attend to cultural norms when considering whether to accept gifts from or give gifts to clients.

Marriage and family therapists consider the potential effects that receiving or giving gifts may have on clients and on the integrity and efficacy of the therapeutic relationship. Marriage and family therapists do not diagnose, treat, or advise on problems outside the recognized boundaries of their competencies. Marriage and family therapists, because of their ability to influence and alter the lives of others, exercise special care when making public their professional recommendations and opinions through testimony or other public statements.

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Marriage and family therapists do not exploit the trust and dependency of students and supervisees. Marriage and family therapists who are in a supervisory role are aware of their influential positions with respect to students and supervisees, and they avoid exploiting the trust and dependency of such persons. Therapists, therefore, make every effort to avoid conditions and multiple relationships that could impair professional objectivity or increase the risk of exploitation.

When the risk of impairment or exploitation exists due to conditions or multiple roles, therapists take appropriate precautions. Marriage and family therapists do not engage in sexual intimacy with students or supervisees during the evaluative or training relationship between the therapist and student or supervisee. Marriage and family therapists do not permit students or supervisees to perform or to hold themselves out as competent to perform professional services beyond their training, level of experience, and competence.

Marriage and family therapists take reasonable measures to ensure that services provided by supervisees are professional. Marriage and family therapists are aware of their influential positions with respect to supervisees, and they avoid exploiting the trust and dependency of such persons.

Supervisors, therefore, make every effort to avoid conditions and multiple relationships with supervisees that could impair professional judgment or increase the risk of exploitation.

When the risk of impairment or exploitation exists due to conditions or multiple roles, supervisors document the appropriate precautions taken. Marriage and family therapists do not disclose supervisee confidences except by written authorization or waiver, or when mandated or permitted by law. In educational or training settings where there are multiple supervisors, disclosures are permitted only to other professional colleagues, administrators, or employers who share responsibility for training of the supervisee.

Marriage and family therapists providing clinical supervision shall not enter into financial arrangements with supervisees through deceptive or exploitative practices, nor shall marriage and family therapists providing clinical supervision exert undue influence over supervisees when establishing supervision fees.

Marriage and family therapists shall also not engage in other exploitative practices of supervisees. Marriage and family therapists respect the dignity and protect the welfare of research participants, and are aware of applicable laws, regulations, and professional standards governing the conduct of research. When institutional approval is required, marriage and family therapists submit accurate information about their research proposals and obtain appropriate approval prior to conducting the research.

Marriage and family therapists are responsible for making careful examinations of ethical acceptability in planning research. To the extent that services to research participants may be compromised by participation in research, marriage and family therapists seek the ethical advice of qualified professionals not directly involved in the investigation and observe safeguards to protect the rights of research participants.

Marriage and family therapists inform participants about the purpose of the research, expected length, and research procedures. They also inform participants of the aspects of the research that might reasonably be expected to influence willingness to participate such as potential risks, discomforts, or adverse effects.

Marriage and family therapists inform participants about any potential research benefits, the limits of confidentiality, and whom to contact concerning questions about the research and their rights as research participants. This obligation requires special thought and consideration when investigators or other members of the research team are in positions of authority or influence over participants.

Marriage and family therapists, therefore, make every effort to avoid multiple relationships with research participants that could impair professional judgment or increase the risk of exploitation.

When offering inducements for research participation, marriage and family therapists make reasonable efforts to avoid offering inappropriate or excessive inducements when such inducements are likely to coerce participation. Information obtained about a research participant during the course of an investigation is confidential unless there is a waiver previously obtained in writing.

When the possibility exists that others, including family members, may obtain access to such information, this possibility, together with the plan for protecting confidentiality, is explained as part of the procedure for obtaining informed consent. Marriage and family therapists do not fabricate research results. Marriage and family therapists disclose potential conflicts of interest and take authorship credit only for work they have performed or to which they have contributed.

Publication credits accurately reflect the relative contributions of the individual involved. Co-authorship on student research should be determined in accordance with principles of fairness and justice. Marriage and family therapists who are the authors of books or other materials that are published or distributed do not plagiarize or fail to cite persons to whom credit for original ideas or work is due.